Media Relations is Dead

Well, Media Relations may not be quite dead but the landscape is… evolving, as @Jonk87 explains in this hotly anticipated/elite/iconic/dynamic video:

UK circulation figures make painful reading for those who care about newspapers, but dealing with journalists is still a very big part of working life for many PR practitioners.

In which case, they would be well advised to read this report from UK agency Twelve Thirty Eight.

Of course, no ISKer would be silly enough to use any of the cliched phrases listed…

A features editor at a national paper sent us a copy of his blacklist
(pinned beside his monitor) which includes:
(1) “reaching out”
(2) “attached is an article which would be good to feature in your…”
(3) “Pleased to announce an exciting new client” [this is not news]
(4) “Hi, I hope you are well”
(5) “Delivery footprint”
(6) Any footprint – unless it is a yeti’s

WORDS IN PRESS RELEASES: TOP TWENTY HATES
Avoid these terms and these practices and (if your story is
sufficiently well crafted) you stand a substantially better
chance of getting your story in print, on air or online:

1. Brits / Hard-working Brits / Hard-up Brits
(an attempt to be ‘accessible’)
2. Dynamic (likely not to be)
3. Paradigm (a ‘silk purse’ word)
4. Elite (i.e. the best thing in Scunthorpe on a Thursday at 3pm)
5. Hotly anticipated (i.e. never heard of it)
6. End-user (‘customer’)
7. Influencer (probably not)
8. Evangelist (a tendency to tweet with loads of hashtags)
9. Deliverables (‘tasks’)
10. Icon/iconic (‘use before 01.01.01 or never’)
11. Rocketed (‘made modest progress’)
12. “An astonishing x per cent” (it rarely is astonishing)
13. Marquee event/marquee client (probably ‘very local’)
14. Going forward (‘in the future’)
15. Ongoing (‘a bit behind schedule’)

Probably the best book to read about the changing relationship between PR and journalism is Flat Earth News, by Nick Davies. You will probably disagree with quite a lot of what he says – I certainly do – but it remains a useful and thought-provoking read.

For now, here is a stimulating debate…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: